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Be Prepared

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Stay Informed

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Know Your PAZ and Reception Center

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Follow Emergency
Instructions 

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Understanding
Nuclear Safety

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More Information

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Test Your Knowledge

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Download Safety PDF

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Be Prepared

Develop an Emergency Plan and Kit

It is important to know which types of disasters could affect your area. Your Emergency Plan will contain emergency contacts, medical information, your protective action zone, evacuation and sheltering information, and more. 

Your Emergency Kit should have supplies to last at least three days for each family member. Keep it in an easy-to-carry bag, such as a backpack, duffel bag, or suitcase.  

kit items include:

  • First Aid Kit (including list of allergies, extra contact lenses, glasses)
  • Non-perishable foods/can opener
  • Matches/lighters
  • Water, one gallon per person per day
  • Medications
  • Flashlight / extra batteries
  • Photo ID
  • Potassium Iodide (KI)
  • Local Map
  • Important documents/cash
  • Clothing/blankets
  • Phone and phone chargers
  • Tools
  • Items for individuals with access and functional needs
  • Personal items
  • Infant/children supplies
  • Pet supplies
Build an Emergency Kit Infographic. Customize Your Kit. Pack Enough for 3 days. Refresh twice a year.

For persons with access and functional needs who may need help in an evacuation – Complete and return the Individuals With Access and Functional Needs Survey. This survey is mailed to you every year. 

Residents must complete and mail, at no cost, the survey card every year. You may also contact your locality to learn what options are available. Contact information is provided under More Information. If you become ill or need assistance at the time of an emergency, contact your local sheriff or ambulance service.

Develop a Pet Emergency Plan and Kit

Not all shelters and hotels accept pets. Plan ahead to stay with family, friends, or at pet-friendly locations if you need to evacuate your home. If a hotel has a no-pets policy, ask the hotel can waive the policy during the emergency. Don’t hesitate to leave your pets behind. 

Kit items include:

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  • Microchip pet
  • Pet carrier
  • Non-spill water and food bowls
  • Pet food and water for at least three days
  • Pet vaccination/medical records
  • Medications
  • Collar with ID tag and leash (include backups)
  • Familiar items/toys/bedding
  • Plastic bags/litter
  • Photograph of your pet
  • Extra newspaper/disinfectant
The following are pet-friendly hotel resources: bringfido.com, dogfriendly.com, pet-friendly-hotels.net, petswelcome.com, tripswithpets.com.

What Do I Need to Know?

  • Develop an Emergency Plan and Kit - keep handy. Visit SCEMD’s Emergency Planning for Your Family webpage for additional info. 
  • Download the SC Emergency Manager Mobile App.
  • Develop a Pet Emergency Plan and Kit - keep handy. Visit SCEMD’s Preparing Your Pets in an Emergency webpage for additional info. 
  • Find a pet friendly hotel. 
  • If identified as someone with access and functional needs who would need help in an evacuation, complete and return the Functional Needs and Assistance Survey Card that is mailed to you annually to register. Or, contact your locality directly for additional info. 

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Stay Informed

Stay Up-to-Date and Listen to Emergency Notifications

Local radio and TV stations will have information and provide actions to take to keep you safe in the unlikely emergency event at V.C. Summer. The public will be alerted and notified of an emergency via the Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS). IPAWS is FEMA’s national system for local alerting that provides authenticated emergency and life-saving information to the public.

In an emergency, an emergency alert will be sent to your emergency alert-enabled mobile device. At no charge to you. When you receive an emergency alert on your phone, tune into one of your local radio or TV station for emergency information and instructions.

Receiving an emergency alert on your phone, does NOT mean you should evacuate. It means turn on your local radio or television station(s) and listen for information and instructions on what to do. A list of local television and radio stations is provided below. 

In order to receive an alert on your phone, you must have a mobile device and be located in the affected area where the alert is being sent. To ensure you receive the alert, go to your mobile phone’s settings, under notifications, scroll to the bottom and confirm all Emergency Alerts are turned on.

In an emergency, parents of school children need to listen to local radio and/or radio station(s) for updates on school status and instructions. Emergency officials will advise schools on what actions to take. If told to evacuate, the schools will go to the to their assigned Reception Center. List of schools and assigned Reception Centers provided below. 

Emergency Alert Radio / TV Stations
Radio TV Station
WCOS 1140 AM
WCOS 97.5 FM
WTCB 106.7 FM 
WLTR 91.3 FM  
WIS Ch. 10
WLTX Ch. 19
WOLO-TV Ch. 25
WACH Ch. 57

What Do I Need to Know?

  • Check emergency alerts are turned on your mobile device.
  • Know how you will be alerted an emergency – an emergency alert to mobile device (via FEMA IPAWS). 
  • Review your child’s emergency school plan on how you will be notified of your child’s status in an emergency each school year.  
  • Learn how to stay informed before, during and after an emergency at SCEMD Stay Informed.  

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Know Your Protective Action Zone (PAZ)
 
and Reception Center 

The 10-mile area around V.C. Summer Nuclear Station is divided up into 13 zones, called Protective Action Zones (PAZ). Knowing your PAZ will let you know if your zone is affected by the emergency and what actions to take to keep you safe.

Listen carefully to instructions specific to your zone. Not all PAZs may be affected by the emergency or need to evacuate. 

If your PAZ is instructed to evacuate, listen for instructions to report to your assigned Reception Center. Reception Centers offer contamination monitoring, and if recommended, potassium iodide (KI). More about Potassium Iodide (KI) below. 

If you live or work within the 10-mile area of V.C. Summer Nuclear Station, go to SCEMD’s Nuclear Facility Zones interactive mapto find your PAZ and Reception Center, or view in the SC Emergency Manager mobile app. You may also view the static map

Below is a list of Reception Centers. Unless told otherwise, use the primary evacuation route below to get to your assigned Reception Center.

COUNTY SECTOR PRIMARY EVACUATION ROUTE RECEPTION CENTER
FAIRFIELD
A-0
213 East, 321 North, to Fairfield Magnet School for
Math and Science
FAIRFIELD A-1 257 North, to 99 North, to 34 East, 321 North, to
Fairfield Magnet School for
Math and Science
FAIRFIELD A-2 34 East, 321 North, to Fairfield Magnet School for
Math and Science
FAIRFIELD B-1 213 East, 321 North, to Fairfield Magnet School for
Math and Science
FAIRFIELD B-2 213 East, 321 North, to Fairfield Magnet School for
Math and Science
FAIRFIELD C-1 215 South, 269 North, 321 North, to Fairfield Magnet School for
Math and Science
FAIRFIELD C-2 215 South, 269 North, 321 North, to Fairfield Magnet School for
Math and Science
RICHLAND D-1 26 East, 20 East, 277 North, 77 North,
Exit 27 Blythewood Rd, to State Rd S-40-59 Muller Rd
Muller Road Middle School *
LEXINGTON D-2 26 East, Exit 103 Harbison Blvd to St. Andrews Rd, West to Crossroads Intermediate School
NEWBERRY E-1 US 176 West, on SC 219 South/West, to Newberry High School
NEWBERRY E-2 US 26 West, on SC 219 South/West, to Newberry High School
NEWBERRY F-1 Broad River Rd North, to SC South, to Hillbrook Lane (West), On SC South/West, to Newberry High School
NEWBERRY F-2 US 176 North, to SC 34 South, to Hillbrook Lane (West),
On SC 219 South/West, to
Newberry High School
 *Students will be released to their parents via the Dutch Fork High School parents’ pick-up line at Dutch Fork High School.
Parents of School Children, identify your child’s school and assigned Reception Center. Below are schools and licensed daycare centers in the 10-mile area around V.C. Summer Nuclear Station and their assigned Reception Center to go to if instructed to evacuate:
  • Central UM
    • Pomaria-Garmany School*
    *Note: Refer to Parent Information Brochure on Critical Incidents, distributed by Newberry County Schools.
  • Crossroads Intermediate School
    • Chapin Baptist Child Development Center
    • Chapin Children Center
    • Chapin Elementary School
    • Chapin Intermediate School
    • Chapin High School
    • Inez’s Children Center
    • Abner Montessori School
    • Mt. Horeb Lutheran Church
  • Fairfield Magnet School
    • Kelly Miller Child Development Center
    • Kelly Miller School
    • McCrorey-Liston Child Development Center
    • McCrorey-Liston School of Technology
  • Muller Road Middle School
    • Academy for Success
    • Spring Hill High School
    • Center for Advanced Technology
    • Chapin Middle School
  • Newberry High School
    • Little Angels Day Care
  • Wightman UM Church
    • Little Mountain School*
    • Mid-Carolina High School*
    • Mid-Carolina Middle School*
    *Note: Refer to Parent Information Brochure on Critical Incidents, distributed by Newberry County Schools.

What Do I Need to Know?

  • Know your PAZ and assigned Reception Center in an evacuation.  
  • If a parent of school children, know your child’s school assigned Reception Center if told to evacuate.

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Follow Instructions

If Your Protective Action Zone is Told to Evacuate:

  • Stay calm - review your emergency plan. In an event, you will have time to take necessary action. 
  • Turn on local radio or TV station(s). 
  • Grab your emergency kit. Grab all essentials for you, your family, and pet(s), You may be away from home for several days.
  • Keep up to date and listen to instructions. Ensure your phone is enabled to receive emergency alerts and listen to local radio or TV for information and potential actions to take to keep you safe.
  • Limit telephone use to emergencies only, keep the lines open for official use.
  • Check on family and friends who may need assistance.
  • Know your children’s school emergency plan. Review emergency school plan(s) and procedure(s) each school year.
  • Secure your home and turn off appliances. Lock doors and windows. Turn off appliances (except refrigerator and freezer) 
  • Tie a white handkerchief or cloth to door or mailbox. This indicates to authorities that you have left your home.
  • Drive safely to your Reception Center. If directed, report to your assigned Reception Center for contamination monitoring and other potential protective actions. Close windows, vents, and turn off air conditioner and heater.
  • If registered as an individual needing evacuation assistance, wait for instructions from your locality.
  • Return home when directed. When the emergency has ended, emergency officials will provide instructions for returning home.
  • Questions during an emergency and for more information, contact SC 2-1-1 and/or visit the SCEMD website. 

If Your Protective Action Zone is Told to Shelter-in-Place:

  • Stay calm – stay inside. Stay in the middle of the building, as much as possible, and close all windows and doors. Prepare to stay inside for at least three days.   
  • If driving, close windows and vents and turn off air conditioner and heater. 
  • Bring pets and livestock inside. Plan for at least three days. 
  • Close all windows and doors, and turn off all devices that draw outside air, if possible. You can use fans or heating devices inside the home to keep warm or cool.   
  • Close chimney flues when possible.
  • Keep informed and listen to instructions. Continue to monitor local radio or TV and follow instructions. Do not evacuate unless directed.   
  • Limit telephone use to emergencies only, keep the lines open for official use.
  • Questions during an emergency and for more information, contact SC 2-1-1 and/or visit the SCEMD website.

Take Potassium Iodide (KI) If Recommended

Not every radiological emergency will result in the release of radiation. Potassium iodide, also known as KI, is a form of iodine. KI is used as a supplemental protective action. KI helps protect your thyroid gland if there is a chance you might be exposed to a harmful amount of radiation. A 2-day supply of KI tablets is provided at no cost to residents living or working within the 10-mile area around V.C. Summer Nuclear Station by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC).  

To obtain your 2-day KI supply, go to your local SCDHEC county public health department and bring some form of identification or paperwork that shows you live or work within the 10-mile area of V.C. Summer Nuclear Station (no appointment necessary):

  • Fairfield County Health Department 
    1136 Kincaid Bridge Rd.; Winnsboro, SC 29180
  • Lexington County Health Department  
  • 1070-B South Lake Dr.; Lexington, SC 29073 
  • Newberry County Health Department
  • 2111 Wilson Rd.; Newberry, SC 29108
  • Richland County Health Department
  • 2000 Hampton St.; Columbia, SC 29204
Residents living outside the 10-mile area can purchase KI tablets from their personal pharmacy.

If Ki is recommended in an emergency, it is Important to follow exact dosing, which can be found on SCDHEC KI Fact Sheet. Especially in young children and infants, giving too much KI can cause more serious side effects and health issues.

Visit SCDHEC’s Radiation, Nuclear Safety webpage for more information on radiation, KI, and South Carolina’s Department of Health and Environmental Control’s Nuclear Response and Emergency Environmental Surveillance section, or call 1-844-723-7377.

Protect Your Livestock, Poultry, and Agriculture   

Livestock and poultry owners are responsible for the care and wellbeing of their animals. Livestock and poultry are domesticated animals typically raised on a farm or other agricultural setting and include but are not limited to cattle, horses/donkeys, pigs, sheep, goats, chickens, and turkeys.

Livestock and poultry owners, farmers, and producers should develop and maintain an emergency plan specific to their needs to use in the case of an evacuation. 

Nuclear plant emergencies may impact livestock, food, and agricultural products. Protective actions for livestock and agricultural products will be issued by appropriate state and local officials. 

These actions may include: 

  • Restriction of movement for livestock, poultry, food and feed items, and other agricultural products. 
  • If possible, shelter farm animals and provide stored (covered) feed and protected water (e.g., protective self-feeders and automatic waterers).
  • Store feed in buildings or cover with plastic or canvas if outdoors.
  • Cover open wells and water tanks.

For more information and guidance on disaster planning for livestock and agriculture, visit: 

What Do I Need to Know?

  • Know what to do if told to evacuate or shelter-in-place in an emergency.   
  • If recommended, know where to get potassium iodide (or KI). 
  • Have a plan for protecting livestock and/or agricultural products. 

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Understanding Nuclear Safety

Nuclear power plants are designed and operated under strict safety and security regulations and practices. Multiple layers of safety systems and structures protect the plant and community from an emergency:
  • Reactor safety systems with several backup systems to provide reliable protection.
  • Containment buildings are made out of thick concrete and steel strong enough to withstand powerful forces (e.g., hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, and explosions).
  • Thorough emergency plans and procedures.
  • Highly skilled, trained, and regularly tested personnel. 
  • Highly secured, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

There are three protective barriers (also referred to as fission product  barriers) that prevent radiation from getting into the environment: (1) fuel cladding, (2) reactor vessel and cooling system, and (3) containment.

  1. Fuel Cladding: The fuel cladding serves as the first and primary fission product barrier. Fuel cladding is the outer layer of the fuel rods, standing between the reactor coolant and the nuclear fuel (i.e., fuel pellets). It prevents corrosion of the fuel.​
  2. Reactor Coolant System: The reactor coolant system acts as the second fission product barrier. Within the large steel reactor vessel, the reactor coolant system includes the pipes and components (e.g., reactor vessel, coolant pumps and piping) that supports the transfer and process of reactor coolant (water) to remove heat from the reactor core.
  3. Containment Building: The containment building acts as the third fission product barrier. The containment is a concrete shield building and steel containment vessel that houses the reactor vessel, steam generators, and piping of the reactor coolant system.
barriers graphic

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) defines four emergency classifications that could occur at a nuclear power station. Dominion Energy would contact federal, state, and local authorities in each of the following situations:

  • Unusual Event is the least serious level, indicating a potential or minor event at the station. Radioactive release, if any, is minimal and far below Federal guidelines. There is no impact to public and no public action needed. Support from state and local emergency officials is not needed.
  • Alert is a more serious level, indicating an event that may affect station safety. Radioactive release, if any, is minimal and far below Federal guidelines. There is no impact to public and no public action needed. State and local emergency officials will share information with the public as needed.
  • Site Area Emergency is a serious level, indicating an event that may affect or has affected plant safety. Radioactive release, if any, should remain under Federal guidelines. When alerted, you should tune in to local radio and television stations for information and instructions. State and local emergency officials may recommend actions for the public to take.
  • General Emergency is the most serious level that involves a serious event that may affect or has affected plant safety. Radioactive release, if any, may exceed Federal guidelines. When alerted, you should tune in to local radio and television stations for information and instructions for protective actions. State and local emergency officials will direct actions for the public to take.

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More Information

Local and State Contact Information

Visit or contact your local/state emergency management or public safety agency for additional emergency preparedness and response information specific to your area. 
 
Office: (803) 635-4444  |   24-hour: (803) 635-5511  |   24-hour (emergency use only):  911
Office: (803) 785-8343   |   24-hour (emergency use only):  911
Office: (803) 321-2135   |  24-hour: (803) 321-2222  |   24-hour (emergency use only):  911
Office: (803) 576 -3400  |  24-hour: (803) 254-3061  |   24-hour (emergency use only):  911
For radiation and nuclear safety related inquiries, contact 1-844-RAD-RESP (1-844-723 -7377)  
Office: (803) 737-8500   |  SCEMD Public Information (activated only during emergencies): (866) 246-0133 

Download SC Emergency Manager, the official app of SCEMD. You can build your own emergency plan(s),  keep track of supplies, and to stay connected loved ones. The app contains other functionality to keep you prepared and informed, including the ability to function without the need of a data connection. Download free today at  Apple App Store or Google Play
 
Call SC 2-1-1 for information on all kinds of topics, including school closures, reception center, emergency preparedness and other emergency planning topics. 

Dominion Energy

Call Dominion Energy toll-free at 800-251-7234 for more information about nuclear power station operations and preparedness, or to request a hard copy of this information mailed to you at no cost.

Download this information into a PDF 

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Test Your Knowledge

Correct!

Incorrect. Please try again.

In an emergency at the nuclear power station, emergency officials will alert the public via an emergency alert message to mobile devices. These are real time alerts sent directly to mobile devices with information about the emergency and instructions on how to stay safe.

Prior to 2023, sirens were the old alerting method before changing to emergency alert messages on mobile devices. Sirens are not used anymore to alert the public.

Turning to social media feeds is not the first action or place to be alerted of an emergency at the nuclear power station. Unofficial social media feeds can spread false or misleading information.

Correct!

Incorrect. Please try again.

Receiving or hearing an emergency alert message or any alert message on your phone, does NOT mean you should evacuate. It means tune into your local radio or television station(s) and listen for information and instructions on what to do, such as shelter-in-place or to evacuate your home.

In an emergency, when you receive an emergency alert message to your mobile device, next action is to tune into local radio and/or TV station(s) for information and instructions.

Do not ignore the emergency alert. The reason for receiving the alert is to get your attention and tune into your local radio or television station(s) for information and instructions.

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If you need help with developing a Family Emergency Plan and/or Emergency Kit, go to SCEMD website and/or the SC Emergency Manager Mobile App for helpful emergency preparedness resources to get you started.

The U.S. Department of Defense will not provide you emergency preparedness resources to help you develop a Family Emergency Plan and/or an Emergency Kit.

The U.S. Department of Treasury will not provide you emergency preparedness resources to help you develop a Family Emergency Plan and/or an Emergency Kit.

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These zones have no connection to public school districts in the State of South Carolina.

These zones have no connection to voting districts in the State of South Carolina.

Protective Action Zones are established to provide instruction on what action(s) to take in an emergency.

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In an emergency at V.C. Summer Nuclear Station, people may call SC 2-1-1 for information and resources related to the emergency.

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Nuclear power stations have 3 fission product barriers (protective barriers) to prevent the release of radioactive fission products from the reactor core to the environment.

  1. 1. First barrier is the fuel cladding.
  2. 2. Second barrier is the Reactor Coolant System.
  3. 3. Third barrier is the Containment Building.

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