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Our Commitment to Getting it Right

Protect the environment by meeting state and federal standards.

Ensure safety in our communities - we live here, too.

Communicate with our neighbors every step of the way.

View the CCR Rule Compliance Data and Information

Dominion Energy intends to continue lowering emissions until it achieves net zero emissions by 2050. As we shift to cleaner, less carbon-intensive electric power generating technologies, Dominion Energy has retired many coal generating units.

Coal ash ponds and landfills have been used by industries for decades to store coal ash - a byproduct of producing electricity using coal powered boilers. In accordance with Federal Coal Combustion Residuals (CCR) regulations, Dominion Energy and all energy producers nationwide must operate and close coal ash ponds according to specific set of requirements. We are closing ash ponds in accordance with the Federal CCR rule and state regulations.

We have plans to close coal ash ponds. We are committed to keeping the environment in our communities clean, and no ash will be released into waterways at any time during this process.

Existing groundwater and surface water sampling remain in place and groundwater monitoring will be performed during and after the closure. Water stored in the ponds is treated before release and meets stringent permit limits. We currently have and are developing site specific plans for closing ash ponds.

Dominion Energy has closed and is currently closing ash ponds in accordance with all applicable federal, state and local environmental regulations and necessary permits.

For more information on groundwater monitoring and data, visit Dominion Energy’s CCR Rule Compliance Data and Information page for groundwater monitoring results and closure plans.

Before the coal ash ponds can be closed the water stored in the ponds must be removed and treated. This process is called “dewatering.” The ash must be dewatered in order to excavate, remove and transport the ash for beneficial use or disposal. Dominion Energy is responsible for ensuring the treated water meets all permit limits prior to discharge. For more information on dewatering, please see the state sections.

Additionally, Dominion Energy is responsible for determining groundwater quality in and around our ponds and landfills. Any impact or potential impact to our environment has our full attention. Groundwater monitoring and reporting will continue even after the ponds are closed. For more information on groundwater monitoring and data, visit Dominion Energy’s CCR Rule Compliance Data and Information page for groundwater monitoring results and closure plans.

Dominion Energy is committed to the health of our communities and our environment and will follow all state and federal guidelines in both the closure and monitoring of our coal ash ponds and landfills.

Regarding our coal ash ponds, all water will be treated prior to release, and we will continue to carefully monitor groundwater after the ponds are closed.

The closures need approval from multiple federal and state agencies and local jurisdictions regarding:

  • Land disturbance
  • Environmental controls
  • Groundwater protection
  • Other associated parts of the project
taking a sample of water from nature

Have a question about our coal ash pond management and closures?

Read the FAQs

Documents & Resources

What's Happening in Your State?

Select a state below for additional information.

In Virginia, we are closing ash ponds in accordance with the Federal CCR Rule, Virginia legislation and the Virginia solid waste management regulations, as Virginia incorporated the Federal CCR regulations into its own regulations. Water stored in the ponds will be tested and treated before release, and existing groundwater and surface water sampling will remain in place at all stations. Dominion Energy takes these results very seriously. Any impact or potential impact to our environment has our full attention. We are committed to keeping the environment in our communities clean, and no ash will be released into waterways at any time during this process. Groundwater monitoring will be performed during and after the closure. We are currently developing site specific plans for closing ash ponds. We will also be developing transportation plans that will mitigate any impacts of truck traffic in the communities we serve in these locations.

For more information on groundwater monitoring and data in Virginia, here's Dominion Energy’s CCR Rule Compliance Data and Information page for groundwater monitoring results and closure plans.


Water Treatment in Virginia

Treatment of water during dewatering is performed using a multistage water treatment and filtration process according to stringent, government-mandated standards ensuring that any discharge has been thoroughly treated and tested. The process incorporates state-of-the-art science and engineering and independent, third-party verification. Water is tested multiple times before it ever reaches the river, ensuring safety for people, wildlife and our environment.

The process of treatment, testing and the release of water from the ash ponds started at Bremo Power Station in in April 2016, at Possum Point Power Station in May 2016, and at Chesterfield Power Station in November 2017.

We’re working with several top firms that specialize in on-site wastewater treatment. Each site has been evaluated individually to select the best treatment process to protect our rivers and other waterways.

We are committed to keeping the waterways in our communities clean. Water quality monitoring results from dewatering are available on our website. Learn more about our state-of-the-art water treatment process and view test results.


Coal Ash Legislation

In 2019, the Virginia General Assembly passed legislation calling for the removal of ash from existing ponds at certain Dominion Energy facilities to lined landfills or for a portion of the ash to be recycled. Dominion Energy supported this legislation. Provisions within the legislation require Dominion Energy to offer a connection to a municipal water supply to any residence within one-half mile of a CCR unit at one of the certain facilities, and if municipal water supply connection is not feasible, Dominion must offer to provide water testing.

As required by Virginia General Assembly 2020 legislation, Dominion Energy submitted a complete survey to Virginia Department of Environmental Quality identifying all drinking water supply wells within 1.5 miles of our coal ash ponds that still contain ash at certain facilities. Additionally, by July 1, 2021, Dominion must conduct a well water test on behalf of the owner of the well.


Recycling Coal Ash

In 2018, as the result of Virginia legislation, Dominion Energy sought proposals to determine the feasibility and costs of recycling at five ash ponds at four power stations (Chesterfield, Possum Point, Chesapeake and Bremo). Dominion Energy already recycles approximately 500,000 tons of coal combustion byproducts each year. The ash is used in making cement and wallboard.

A total of 12 proposals and over 2,100 pages of information were received and evaluated. Bids were received for proposals to recycle for each of the four power stations. Bids were considered if they encapsulated the ash, as defined by coal ash regulations. Encapsulation binds the ash into a solid, such as concrete, brick, or wallboard for safe reuse.

Virginia Facilities

Chesterfield Power Station is the largest coal fired power station in Virginia and is located about 15 miles south of Richmond on the James River in Chesterfield County. Coal Combustion Residuals (CCR) at the Chesterfield station was originally managed in the Lower and Upper Ponds where it was wet sluiced from the station prior to settling out and managed in long term storage. Chesterfield Power Station switched from wet sluicing coal ash to a dry ash management system in 2017, and newly produced ash is managed in an onsite CCR solid waste management facility (landfill) permitted by the Virginia DEQ to receive and manage dry coal ash. In the interim, the Lower and Upper Ponds continue to comply with all operational requirements found in the state and federal regulations and permits, including inspections, fugitive dust emission controls and groundwater monitoring. The Lower and Upper ponds will be closed in accordance with all applicable federal, state and local environmental regulations and once necessary permits are obtained. Groundwater monitoring and reporting will continue even after the ponds are closed. Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) sludge is generated as a byproduct from scrubbers or FGD used to clean air emissions. The FGD sludge is primarily composed of calcium sulfate or gypsum, which is beneficially reused as wallboard quality gypsum. Additionally, Chesterfield Power Station recycles a significant amount of bottom ash to an aggregate manufacturer.

Learn More About the Chesterfield Coal Ash Project

Bremo Power Station, located along the James River in Fluvanna County, is Virginia’s oldest coal-fired power station. In June 2014, the facility converted Units 3 and 4 from coal to natural gas and subsequently entered cold storage in 2018 and closed in 2019. New coal ash has not been generated at the site since 2014. Coal ash from the former operation of Bremo’s coal-fired boilers was managed in three onsite ponds, the North Pond, the East Pond and the West Pond for the settling and intermediate storage of coal ash.

Dominion Energy has completed the removal of coal ash from the East and West ponds by consolidating the Coal Combustion Residuals (CCR) in North Pond under the authorization of a Virginia Solid Waste Permit for Closure. The Closure of the North Pond by removal is now being planned. Dominion Energy continues to comply with all operational requirements for the ponds, found in the state and federal regulations and permits, including inspections, fugitive dust emission controls and groundwater monitoring. The ponds will be closed in accordance with all applicable federal, state and local environmental regulations and once necessary permits are obtained. Groundwater monitoring and reporting will continue after the ponds are closed.

Learn how water from the coal ash ponds at Bremo Power Station is removed, treated, and tested before being released.

Learn More About the Bremo Coal Ash Project

Chesapeake Energy Center (CEC) is located adjacent to the Elizabeth River in Chesapeake, Virginia. CEC generated power from four coal-fired units and four gas turbines. The coal-fired boilers ceased operations on December 31, 2014 and have been decommissioned. Dry fly ash was stored in a landfill permitted by Virginia DEQ since 1985. The landfill ceased receiving material prior to the Coal Combustion Residuals (CCR) rule and is therefore not subject to the CCR rule requirements. Adjacent to the landfill is the inactive Bottom Ash Pond, which received wet sluiced bottom ash during the operation of CEC after 1985. CCR from the landfill, Bottom Ash Pond, and the former pond will be excavated and removed in accordance with the 2019 legislation passed by the Virginia General Assembly and signed by Governor Northam.

The Bottom Ash Pond and landfill continue to comply with all operational requirements found in the state and federal regulations and permits, including inspections, fugitive dust emission controls and groundwater monitoring. The landfill, Bottom Ash Pond, and former ash pond will be closed in accordance with all applicable federal, state and local environmental regulations. Groundwater monitoring and reporting will continue even after these units are closed.

Chesapeake Memorandum of Agreement

  • Dominion Energy is committed to consistent standards of closure and protection of the environment for all the coal ash at Chesapeake Energy Center. We have signed a Memorandum of Agreement with the Commonwealth of Virginia where we agree to groundwater monitoring and closure steps for all the coal ash at the Chesapeake Energy Center under the same strict standards imposed by federal and state ash rules.
  • That means all the ash facilities at Chesapeake Energy Center will require ongoing groundwater monitoring, corrective action, as well as closure and post-closure care under the jurisdiction of the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality. The same closure standards and groundwater protection standards will apply to the Bottom Ash Pond, the Landfill, and the Historic Pond at the site.

Clover Power Station is located along the Staunton River, in Halifax County, Virginia and has two coal-fired units.

Fly ash and bottom ash are collected in the facility’s air pollution equipment and the boilers, respectively, and transferred in a dry state to the onsite lined Stage 3 landfill. Stage 3 of the Clover landfill is permitted by the Virginia DEQ as an industrial solid waste management facility under the Virginia Solid Waste Management regulations. The Stage 3 landfill is constructed with a high-density polyethylene liner that extends under the adjacent leachate collection system. The Stage 1 and 2 portions of the Clover solid waste management facility reached their maximum storage capacity in April 2003 and were subsequently closed in compliance with Virginia DEQ regulations.

Clover also has two sludge sedimentation basins used for settling wastewater solids, including FGD not captured in the station’s filter press, prior to removal and disposal in Stage 3. The sludge sedimentation basins were retrofitted with a Coal Combustion Residuals (CCR) rule compliant liner in accordance with the CCR regulations. These two basins fully meet CCR regulation requirements, and will continue to be operated in accordance with all applicable regulations and permits including inspections, fugitive dust emission controls and groundwater monitoring, and will post on Dominion Energy’s website the resulting information required by the regulations to be made public. Groundwater monitoring and reporting will continue even after the ponds are closed.

Possum Point Power Station is located approximately 30 miles south of Washington, D.C. along the Potomac River.

The station no longer has any coal-fired units. Coal Combustion Residuals (CCR) at Possum Point were managed in five ponds, A, B, C, D, and E. These ponds stopped receiving CCR after the conversion of Units 3 and 4 to natural gas in 2003. CCR has been removed from A, B, C and E ponds and consolidated in Pond D under a Virginia Solid Waste Permit for Closure. Pond D has a clay liner and a partial slurry containment wall. Pond D will be closed by removal under the 2019 legislation signed by Governor Northam. Dominion Energy will continue to comply with all operational requirements for the ponds, found in the state and federal regulations and permits, including inspections, fugitive dust emission controls and groundwater monitoring. The ponds will be closed in accordance with all applicable federal, state and local environmental regulations and once necessary permits are obtained. Groundwater monitoring and reporting will continue even after the ponds are closed.

We lend a hand in banding peregrine falcon chicks nesting at our Possum Point Power Station.

The Virginia City Hybrid Energy Center (VCHEC), located in St. Paul, Virginia, is a state-of-the-art coal-fired power station and its circulating fluidized bed (CFB) unit uses coal, waste coal and biomass for its fuel.

VCHEC’s advanced CFB technology enables the use of run-of-mine coal, waste coal, and renewable biomass, which are typically locally sourced. Use of waste coal, which often is stored along river and stream banks, is helping to reclaim these areas and reduce pollution in Virginia waterways. CFB technology combined with modern post-combustion controls produces low emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, particulate matter and mercury.

Fly ash and bottom ash are collected from the power station and moved by truck to the onsite Curley Hollow Coal Combustion Residuals (CCR) landfill. The landfill is permitted by Virginia DEQ as an industrial solid waste management facility under the Virginia Solid Waste Management regulations and is equipped with a bottom liner and leachate collection/treatment systems. As the landfill is an active landfill under federal and state CCR regulations, Dominion Energy will continue to operate in accordance with all applicable regulations including inspections, fugitive dust emission controls and groundwater monitoring.

Yorktown Power Station is located in Yorktown, Virginia along the York River. The station presently has a single oil-fired unit. Two former coal-fired units ceased operation in 2019 and have been decommissioned. The adjacent Yorktown Power Station Landfill completed closure in September 2020, under federal and state regulatory requirements and is now considered by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality to be in post-closure. During post-closure, Dominion will continue to monitor groundwater and perform routine inspections to ensure security features remain in place and no damage has occurred to the closed facility.

In South Carolina we are removing ash from ash ponds by removal and work is nearing completion. Existing groundwater sampling has been and remains in place at all stations. Dominion Energy takes these results very seriously. Any impact or potential impact to our environment has our full attention. Groundwater monitoring and reporting will continue even after the ponds are closed. We are committed to keeping the environment in our communities clean, and no ash will be released into waterways at any time during this process.

For more information on groundwater monitoring and data in South Carolina, here's Dominion Energy’s CCR Rule Compliance Data and Information page for groundwater monitoring results and closure plans.

Water Treatment in South Carolina

Treatment of water during dewatering is performed using physical and chemical processes in stages to meet stringent NPDES permit limits prior to discharging. This treatment ensures that no ash enters state waters and the water is safe for the environment.

South Carolina Facilities

The 420 MW Cope Station is a coal and gas fired generation facility located approximately 1.5 miles southwest of the town of Cope in Orangeburg County, South Carolina. CCR material generated at Cope is placed in the onsite Industrial Solid Waste CCR Landfill. The onsite CCR landfill is permitted by the South Carolina DHEC to receive and manage dry coal ash and dry Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) material. The onsite landfill meets the Federal CCR regulation requirements and will continue to operate in accordance with all applicable state and federal regulations and permits. The FGD material is generated as a byproduct from scrubbers or FGD used to clean air emissions.

Dominion Energy South Carolina (DESC) owns and operates the 700 MW Wateree Generating Station plant, located along the Wateree River, approximately 25 miles southeast of Columbia, South Carolina. The site included a 104-acre Ash Pond that contained coal combustion residuals (CCR) including sluiced fly ash and bottom ash. The 104-acre ash pond was certified closed and approved by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) in November 2019. The closure project consisted of the excavation and landfill disposal of coal ash and impacted soil from the ash pond. The excavated material was placed in the onsite Industrial Solid Waste CCR Landfill. The onsite CCR landfill is permitted by the SCDHEC to receive and manage dry coal ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) material. The onsite landfill meets the Federal CCR regulation requirements and will continue to operate in accordance with all applicable state and federal regulations and permits.

Wateree also has two FGD sludge sedimentation basins used for settling wastewater solids, including FGD sludge, prior to removal and disposal in the onsite landfill. The FGD material is generated as a byproduct from scrubbers or FGD used to clean air emissions. The FGD material is primarily composed of calcium sulfate or gypsum. The sludge sedimentation basins are Coal Combustion Residuals (CCR) units and constructed in accordance with the Federal CCR regulations. These two basins fully meet CCR regulation requirements and will continue to be operated in accordance with all state and federal applicable regulations and permits.

The 660 MW Williams Station is a coal and oil fired power generating facility located in Berkeley County, South Carolina. The Williams Industrial Solid Waste CCR Landfill is located offsite near the Williams Station. CCR materials generated at Williams Station are placed in the offsite Industrial Solid Waste CCR Landfill. The offsite CCR landfill is permitted by the South Carolina DHEC to receive and manage dry coal ash and Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) material. The offsite landfill meets the CCR regulation requirements and will continue to operate in accordance with all applicable state and federal regulations and permits. The FGD material is generated as a byproduct from scrubbers or FGD used to clean air emissions. The FGD material is primarily composed of calcium sulfate or gypsum.

Williams also has one FGD sludge sedimentation basin used for settling wastewater solids, including FGD sludge, prior to removal and disposal in the offsite landfill. The sludge sedimentation basin is a Coal Combustion Residuals (CCR) unit and was constructed and approved to be placed into operation by SCDHEC in 2009.

This pond will be closed in 2020 and a new pond that meets the Federal CCR regulations will be opened at the site.

In West Virginia, we are closing ash ponds in accordance with the Federal CCR rule. Groundwater sampling has been and remains in place at the station. Dominion Energy takes these results very seriously. Any impact or potential impact to our environment has our full attention. Groundwater monitoring and reporting will continue even after the ponds are closed. We are committed to keeping the environment, including waterways, in our communities clean.

For more information on groundwater monitoring and data in West Virginia, here's Dominion Energy’s CCR Rule Compliance Data and Information page for groundwater monitoring results and closure plans.

West Virginia Facilities

Mount Storm Power Station is located in northeastern West Virginia and has three coal-fired units. The Station also uses the latest technology to remove and capture fly ash and sulfur dioxide from the environment. The fly ash is handled dry in silos and transported by truck to the onsite Coal Combustion Residuals (CCR) landfill. Limestone scrubbers capture approximately 95 percent of the sulfur dioxide from the boilers and generate FGD sludge as a byproduct. The sludge is primarily composed of calcium sulfate or gypsum. The FGD sludge from Mount Storm is being used in mine reclamation projects to neutralize mine acid runoff or is used in the manufacturing of Portland cement when it meets end-user specifications. FGD sludge that cannot be beneficially reused is stored in the onsite FGD landfill. The Mount Storm CCR landfill is permitted under the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection Solid Waste Management regulations and is operated in accordance with this permit as well as the CCR regulation including inspections, fugitive dust emission controls and groundwater monitoring and is equipped with synthetic liners and leachate collection/treatment systems.

Mt. Storm has three CCR ponds that are used as station low volume waste ponds and to settle CCR solids from the fly and bottom ash management areas. These three ponds fully meet CCR regulation requirements and are operated in accordance with all applicable regulations including inspections, fugitive dust emission controls and groundwater monitoring. Groundwater monitoring and reporting will continue even after the ponds and landfill are closed.

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